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Coop Di Leu Podcasts

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Dr. William (Bill) Harvey

Distinguished Scholar

American Association for Access, Equity, & Diversity

Intersectionality & Internationality:
Building Bridging Across Sectors - Part 2

May 17, 2023

02_Dr. William (Bill) Harvey
00:00 / 17:42

Dr. William (Bill) Harvey was the second national expert to take part in our series of Transformative Conversations on Intersectionality and Internationality: Building Bridges Across Sectors. Ken “Dr. Coop” Coopwood hosted. Bill Harvey has long been regarded as a transformative
speaker, educator, and activist. The conversation between these two national experts has been ongoing for over twenty years. However, the context of these conversations has challenged both for more compelling and forward- thinking solutions for listeners and change agents.

Dr. Harvey delivers essential thoughts about the foundation of American education and the current assault on DEI progress, all within the frame of intersectionality and internationality. He also raises practical questions about today’s role of the CDO and the responsibility to become adequately equipped for today’s higher education context. Dr. Harvey brings over fifty years of higher education leadership experience to our conversation.

 

This series raises three core questions for listeners to consider. These questions will be raised in all four parts for comparison across sectors.

 

  • How do you describe the usage of the words intersectionality and internationalism used in your scope of responsibility? And how does this usage help increase diversity according to your definition?

  • How do you see the different structures (intersectionality and internationalism) working together - not in concept, but in function?

  • What are you doing in your current role that represents a gain from previous DEI experiences?

The concepts and precepts about intersectionality and internationality run rampant in American social and political arenas. However, there are fundamental ways to understand why the words have been coined with condescending and uplifting views. Dr. Harvey brings us from base descriptions in the dictionary to more active adaptations and applications in the Journal of American Medical Association and elsewhere.

KEY POINTS:

  • Negative impact of discrimination has caused the death of more than 1.6 million in the Black community over the past twenty years.

  • In 2018 alone, failing to achieve health equity resulted in a 248 billion-dollar loss to the American economy.

  • When we live engrained in our day-to-day lives, we often miss the big picture or larger-scale considerations of our immediate circumstances.

  • To dig deeper into the American experience, we must examine what we want to see happen that aligns with the country’s mantle, “liberty and justice for all.”

  • Organizations historically promote the mantra yet work against those principles.

  • In some states, people are escaping the realities many others have faced.

  • The responsibility or onus for diversity does not fall squarely on the shoulders of an institution’s diversity professional.

  • The pushback on DEI today should have been anticipated to keep DEI leaders from being placed into autocratic positions.

  • Institutions should be called upon to articulate what they stand for regarding DEI because the articulation feeds policy and day-to-day behavior expectations.

  • Institutions are now being pushed increasingly to exclusionary practices, which can never be good for long-term societal growth.


QUOTABLES:
“The general well-being of all of us depends on how society and the economy operate.”


“We’re all in this together. It makes sense for us to try and change the conditions that certain groups are facing that are disproportionality negative.”


"It is not uncommon for persons to be victimized by members of society in order for them to maintain their status in the hierarchy of social order. This exists in many societies around the world, certainly in the US.”

“We tend to run away from conversations that address the deep structures of discrimination.”

“The fact that many people have not brought to the table the experiences of certain groups makes them a supporter of the status quo.”


“It’s incumbent upon [higher education], which plays a huge part in the way in which intersectionality gets examined, to bring the truth to the table.”


“Historically, every time there has been an action or movement on behalf of a minority group, there has been a reaction to that.”


“If DEI values are seen on an institution’s website, then the institutions ought to have planned to stand up for them, defend them, and maintain ways to examine and implement those values as well.”

“We may need organizations outside the academy to save the academy.”


“We have a responsibility to make sure higher education does, in fact, reaffirm its commitment to the things that are going to make society the one that we say that we want.”


Other Resources:

www.merriam-webster.com

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama


Products/Resources:
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Transformative Conversations is produced by Coopwood Diversity Leadership & Education Universal.

Dr. William (Bill) Harvey
Dr. Sylvia Carey-Butler
DOIT Survey
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Dr. Sylvia Carey-Butler

Vice President for Institutional Equity and Diversity

Brown University

Intersectionality & Internationality:
Building Bridging Across Sectors - Part 1 

March 2, 2023

Dr. Sylvia Carey-Butler
00:00 / 18:43

Dr. Sylvia Carey-Butler began our series of Transformative Conversations on Intersectionality and Internationality! This inaugural series is themed: Building Bridges Across Sectors and was hosted by Ken “Dr. Coop” Coopwood. The conversation between these two national experts proved compelling and forward-thinking about the conditions in higher education that make the fight for diversity, equity, and inclusion a national imperative. 

 

After welcoming remarks, Dr. Carey-Butler brought forward some of the most central thoughts about today’s DEI environment. She informed listeners about the intersectional and international initiatives happening at Brown University, where she serves as the Vice President for Institutional Equity and Diversity. 

 

This series raises three core questions for listeners to consider. These questions will be raised in all four parts for comparison across various sectors. 

  • How do you describe the usage of the words intersectionality and internationalism used in your scope of responsibility? And how does this usage help increase diversity according to your definition? 

  • How do you see the different structures (intersectionality and internationalism) working together - not in concept, but in function? 

  • What are you doing in your current role that represents a gain from previous DEI experiences? 

 

The concepts and precepts about intersectionality and internationality run rampant in American social and political arenas. However, there are fundamental ways to understand why the words have been coined with condescending and uplifting views. Dr. Carey-Butler helps us better understand some of the approaches used in higher education. 

Key Points     

  • We all show up every day with multiple identities. These identities makeup how we do the work that we do. 

  • Intersectionality is not about hierarchy in race relations or the special treatment of any group or creed. Instead, it is a practice of selflessness and awareness of divisional impact at personal and systemic levels. 

  • Wanting people to become more selfless and more aware of the impact of division does not equate to the rise of one group over another. 

  • The effort to divide the nation is an act of power and an attempt to advance one’s agenda. 

  • Intersectionality is also about global atonement among and between groups, reconciliation for revelation (about past, present, and future injustices), and reform. 

  • We must think about how to cascade down resources to our communities. 

  • The DEI space really is about global atonement and opportunity among and between groups, reconciliation for revelations about the past, present, and future injustices if we don’t reform. 

Quotables:

“In order to get students and administrators to think about “the other,” you have to get them to engage.” 

“We need to always look at our work, regardless of where we are situated, through an international lens.” 

“Internationalism, as a concept, gives the term “inclusion” its value.” 

“When we get a chance to hear the story, understand people’s differences and different perspectives, that really draws us closer together.” 

“We cannot do DEI separate from academics.” 

“If you care anything about the future of educating our young people, then you must speak up and amplify our voice.”  

“Diversity is mostly about composition; inclusion is about the opportunity, but the harder element of this work that we do is the equity piece.” 

“There’s something “freeing” about being at a private institution at this point in time. We’re not in an inflection moment in this country. Quite frankly, we are at a very dangerous moment in this country.” 

Other Resources:

Dillard University in Louisiana

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Transformative Conversations is produced by Coopwood Diversity Leadership & Education Universal.

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With Dr. Christine Priddie

Assistant Research Scientist

National Survey of Student Engagement

Center of Postsecondary Research

 

The DOIT Survey Results and Implications

April 1, 2022

Click the play arrow to listen
00:00 / 13:24

In this episode, Ken “Dr. Coop” Coopwood welcomes Dr. Christine Priddie. Dr. Priddie is the Coop Di Leu Researcher. She’s affiliated with the American Education Research Association (AERA) and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). Dr. Priddie shares her comments about the significance and importance of the Diverse Organization Impact and Transformation (DOIT) research. 

Several institutions were part of the DOIT pilot effort to validate and circulate this ground-breaking instrument (survey) for infrastructural auditing and scrutiny. The pilot cohort received their grades, which were confirmed by Dr. Priddie, and several questions surfaced about the results. This podcast addressed those questions and more.


  
Understanding what the certification is all about, what bad grades mean, and its important implications round out this Coop Di Leu Transformative Conversations segment. Drs. Coopwood and Priddie clarify that institutions need to establish their positions on the A to F survey continuum. Grades matter, and they tell an insightful and revealing story about diversity infrastructure issues.



The difference between transformative progress and transaction progress is a core principle to progress toward diversity milestones. An institution’s historical narrative of inclusivity to the importance of being honest about what should be a best practice for transformation. Listen in as Dr. Priddie reviews comments on the preliminary DOIT results.


Key Points     

  • Several institutions are doing well to transform their campuses, but they may not know it.

  • A score of “B” or better resulting from preliminary survey distribution means an institution has a jump start towards attaining the DOIT national certification.

  • After taking the DOIT survey, some institutions learn that they may not be as far down the road to transformation as they think.

  • Results from the survey can be categorized to meet an institution’s level of budgetary, personnel, and collaborative resources.

  • It’s more challenging to respond to diversity-related red flags while institutions maintain a homogeneous leadership population.

Quotables:

“We need to look at institutions that scored well on the preliminary surveys and determine how they could score well and incorporate these efforts at other institutions.”

“Bad grades simply mean that areas within the DEI space need improvement, not that an institution is racist or fundamentally flawed in its approach or beliefs about diversity transformation.”

“Areas found to need improvement should be considered as “targets” instead of trying to improve the whole institution at one time.”

“If an institution achieves the same diversity-related results for the past five years, there must be an assessment that questions why their approach is considered a best practice.”

“A grade that is below expectations should signal that an institution may be more heavily engaged in diversity transactions than diversity transformation.”

Other Resources:

Products/Resources:

Visit the CoopDiLeu website: coopdileu.com or follow us on social media:

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Transformative Conversations is produced by Coopwood Diversity Leadership & Education Universal.

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